Legalizing Marijuana More Popular Than Republicans

by: Chris Bowers

Fri Feb 20, 2009 at 13:34


Here is a political realignment for you: legalizing marijuana is now more popular than Republicans.

Details in the extended entry.

Chris Bowers :: Legalizing Marijuana More Popular Than Republicans
Two recent polls show that legalizing marijuana, which is not treated as a mainstream position by either the political or media establishment, to be more popular than numerous other positions that are considered mainstream. First, here are the polls:

CBS:

CBS News/New York Times Poll. Jan. 11-15, 2009. N=1,112 adults nationwide

"Do you think that the use of marijuana should be made legal or not?"

Should not 52%, Should 41%, Unsure 7%

Rasmussen, February 13-14, 1,000 adults

In a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey, Americans are closely divided on the question of whether marijuana should be legalized: 40% say it should be, while 46% disagree. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure which course is better.(...)

Americans under the age of 40 are much more supportive of legalizing the drug than are older Americans.

While legalizing marijuana is not a majority or a plurality position at this time, it is very close to becoming one. Not only do the long-term trendlines show a dramatic shift in favor of legalization, but a majority of the population under the age of 40 is already in favor of legalization. As such, despite no major political leaders advocating on behalf of it, right now it is only a matter of time--perhaps less than a decade--before legalizing marijuana becomes a majority position nationwide.

It should also be noted that, at 40-41% support, legalizing marijuana is more popular than all of the following:

In short, legalizing marijuana is more popular than the Republican Party, most leading Republicans, and virtually the entire Republican platform.

I'm sure this is just a partial list so, in the comments, feel free to list more "mainstream" opinions that are less popular than legalizing marijuana.


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Heh. (4.00 / 4)
Well, these days some folks need some weed to relieve the pain caused by the Rethuglicans. ;-)



Yes, Virginia, there are progressives in Nevada.


Hahah (4.00 / 4)
I think Michael Steele's got his new slogan right there. "The Grand Old Party: We're less horrible than Chemotherapy!"

Conduct your own interview of Sarah Palin!

[ Parent ]
No doubt, especially in California (0.00 / 0)
What's more, another new poll released today found that 58% (!?) of those on the west coast support legalization (by zogby--yeah, not the best but still...)

I wonder if the need for relief from the pain caused by the Republican's budget shenanigans is driving the #'s out here.  :)


[ Parent ]
Since when (4.00 / 1)
is being a Republican a "mainstream position"?

;)

Those polls are pretty shocking. Quite honestly I don't agree with full legalization. For medical uses, yes, and make it the lowest priority and maybe only a fine. But not entirely legal.  

John McCain: Beacuse lobbyists should have more power


Here's what I think. (4.00 / 7)
Tobacco and alcohol are just as dangerous substances as cannibis, yet they're both legal, taxed, and regulated. Why can't we just do the same with pot? It's ridiculous that cigarettes (aka "cancer sticks") are still available most everywhere in the US and alcohol's commonly accepted as "OK to use", but there's still this stigma about pot that baffles me.

Yes, Virginia, there are progressives in Nevada.

[ Parent ]
Same argument can be used to outlaw (0.00 / 0)
tobacco and alcohol. Legalizing a drug that is predominantly comsumed by smoking has been made far less likely by the success of anti-tobacco campaigns.  

"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
There's no way that's going to happen (4.00 / 1)
Tobacco's not going to be outlawed, and alcohol isn't going to be outlawed again.

[ Parent ]
I agree about alcohol (0.00 / 0)
but smoking has already been relegated to the street corners and dark doorways. Can't even light up in a seedy bar.  No way that culture is gonna let anyone blow a doob in a coffee house.

I'm reacting because I don't that an argument for legalization based on saying pot is "no worse" than alcohol is, inherently, a weak position because alcohol has demonstrable and well-known negative influences in our society. Ditto relating it to tobacco smoking.

Better to talk about benefits like anti-nausea and anti-psychotics. Not to mention the no-smoke means of dosing.


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
Benefits? (4.00 / 6)
How about this - we ALL benefit when government doesn't arbitrarily curtail personal freedoms. As far as I am concerned, that is the beginning and end of any marijuana legalization debate.  

"Don't hate the media, become the media" -Jello Biafra

[ Parent ]
Personal freedoms? (0.00 / 0)
Like what? Smoking cigarettes in a local bar? Maybe carrying a concealed weapon? Even using the internet without wondering whether I might be asked to grant retroactive immunity to the corporation that grants me the ability to use the "net roots" for tracking who I communicate with? How about the right to walk the streets of my city at night?



"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
How does Roe vs. Wade not apply here? (4.00 / 2)
If we have a constitutional right to privacy to do what we want to with our own bodies, how can the government regulate what we choose to put into them?  

I'm not arguing for legalization, just curious what people think of this line of legal argument, as I was discussing it with a friend recently...


[ Parent ]
Agree 100% (0.00 / 0)


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
Tried that. Didn't work. (4.00 / 3)

 Making alcohol illegal turned out to be a disaster for everyone involved -- except organized crime syndicates.

 In 1933 we learned from that debacle, and put an end to that silly puritanical experiment.

 It's time to end the equally silly puritanical experiment of banning marijuana.  

"We judge ourselves by our ideals; others by their actions. It is a great convenience." -- Howard Zinn


[ Parent ]
Prohibition was a great cultural resource that keeps on giving! (0.00 / 0)
Without Prohibition, we'd have fewer great movies, jazz might never have gotten so popular, and who would have run against Nixon in 1960?

Our current War on (some) Drugs supplies us all with nightly entertainment, and shapes the rest of the world's view of us.

But it's come to a standstill.

I have a Modest Proposal, to kick it up a notch:

  http://just-john.com/outlaw_ch...


[ Parent ]
Lots of reasons... (4.00 / 3)
Lots of reasons why marijuana prohibition is ridiculous, but first and foremost it is an unjustified curtailment of person freedom. You want to take away my freedom, you better give me a damn good reason. As far as I know, no one has yet to offer those reasons.  

"Don't hate the media, become the media" -Jello Biafra

[ Parent ]
Free and totalitarian societies (4.00 / 1)

In a free society, every adult behavior and product is legal and permissible by default, unless the government can make the case that it shouldn't be. But the burden of argument is on the government.

In a totalitarian society, every adult behavior and product is illegal by default, and an individual's freedom to do or consume anything is subject to the government generously allowing him to do so.

 We call ourselves a "free" country, but we subscribe to the totalitarian model when it comes to marijuana (and other things). There is NO rational case for marijuana being illegal. None. There's not even really a religious case -- God created it, didn't He? So why is the default that it's illegal?

"We judge ourselves by our ideals; others by their actions. It is a great convenience." -- Howard Zinn


[ Parent ]
have to say im always disappointed to see a lack of respect (0.00 / 0)
for civil liberties amongst dems.  spare me your weak arguments.  legalize drugs, guns and prostitutes.  regulate and tax them all.  

why dont we act like adults and give each other the freedoms that we currently pretend that we have.


[ Parent ]
OK, in all seriousness... (4.00 / 3)
I think we're seeing the comeback of "the permissive society". I'm "Gen Y" myself, and I can say that even my conservative friends mostly support our social agenda, such as marriage equality, choice, and the end of the "drug war". Once my generation actually comes to political power, I think we'll start seeing major changes to this previously accepted norm of public policy intervening in issues of private morality.

Yes, Virginia, there are progressives in Nevada.

apples and oranges (4.00 / 11)
sheesh!

Nobody in their right mind would advocate the legalization of Republicans.  It would cost billions just to keep them lit.


It's a gateway drug! (4.00 / 4)
You'd have to be high to be a Republican. Maybe legalization is their path back to power.

Conduct your own interview of Sarah Palin!

[ Parent ]
LOVE IT! (0.00 / 0)
You'd have to be high to be a Republican.

Maybe this explains their recent behavior in Congress? They're too buzzed to think for themselves? :-D

Yes, Virginia, there are progressives in Nevada.


[ Parent ]
Nah, not their style (4.00 / 7)
Republicans are hyper-aggressive, steal everything that isn't nailed down, trash a place when they're over and fixate on fiddling endlessly with a handful of pointless tasks. They are clearly coke, speed and heroin people.  

[ Parent ]
I know this fairly prominent local Republican from college (0.00 / 0)
And when we were in college, he was THE biggest stoner I've ever met.  And that is saying something, God, believe me.

Stoner Republicans do exist.


[ Parent ]
It's the means of delivery that does it. (0.00 / 0)
The constant use of un-lubed suppositories would explain the behavior of many Repubs.

[ Parent ]
Of course. (0.00 / 0)
We all know them -- they are the ones who never buy their own.

Montani semper liberi

[ Parent ]
don't forget Rush (4.00 / 3)
They're pill poppers because those are "legal" even when you're bribing your doctor to overprescribe.

But then there's Ted Haggard and his crystal meth habit.

But yeah, cocaine seems right up their alley.  That's probably a better explation for the disparity in crack/cocaine sentencing than pure racism.  Republicans and their corporate allies do a lot of coke, not so much needle drugs.



[ Parent ]
Good points, all (4.00 / 2)
Though what I was mainly trying to get at is that their behavior as a party is a better analog of the behavior of tweakers, junkies and cokeheads than it is of typical stoners.

[ Parent ]
Many progressives admit experimenting with Republicanism (4.00 / 3)
in college over a long hot Fourth of July weekend.


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
Maybe we can list Atlas Shrugged (4.00 / 3)
As a schedule 1 narcotic?  Luckily for Republicans I don't believe in putting addicts in prison, just treat objectivism as a health problem.  Sociopathy is already in the DSM anyway.

[ Parent ]
I really, really like reading Atlas Shrugged (4.00 / 1)
while burning Kind Buds and tasting the brownies.


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
I experimented in high school. (0.00 / 0)
Thought Ayn Rand was a genius, campaigned for Reagan. Luckily I outgrew that before I was old enough to vote.

Montani semper liberi

[ Parent ]
I read Atlas shrugged in HS, too (4.00 / 2)
It was a fun novel, but it makes me laugh now to think back on Ayn Rand's description of her characters motivations. Since high school I learned that almost no adults think or act like Ayn Rand characters. She was clueless about human nature.

ec=-8.50 soc=-8.41   (3,967 Watts)

[ Parent ]
a truer statement has never been written (4.00 / 1)
That's her fatal flaw. I cannot imagine humans acting in that way in large enough numbers to make entire world.


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
Atlas Shrugged (0.00 / 0)
Yeah, I confess that for a few months in the late 1970s, I thought Ayn Rand was like Heinlein, only smarter.

Since then, I've had the opportunity to witness a room full of smart, competent people decide where to have lunch.

Getting them all to decide to boycott the world and all go into hiding in the SAME place, at the SAME time?  Sheep, maybe.  Smart, competent humans?  Never!  

By the way, there's a fellow who posits that Atlas Shrugged was part one of a trilogy, and that Anthem was part three.  He talks about the lost "second book," Shrug Harder.  http://bradhicks.livejournal.c...


[ Parent ]
Cut to the chase (0.00 / 0)
I had a strong desire to dose Rand on acid and take her to a Dead Show.  

"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
One thing that sets me apart from most "Leftys" (4.00 / 1)
is that I still think Atlas Shrugged is a good book. I may not embrace Objectivism as earnestly as I once thought I did, but I still appreciate her devotion to those that possess actual knowledge, skills, and ability. Her complete disdain for those undeserving of the economic power they have inherited is probably one of the strongest arguments in favor of the inheritance tax ever contrived, but its left wanting because so many one the Left have such a hard time taking Rand as a thinker and sorting wheat from chaff as the scase may be.

Its a very good platform for discussion, if nothing else, because it is clearly stated. Even if one ends up rejecting almost every premise, you find that you are following her dictum: "examine your premises". Certainly, Dagney Taggert would understabd is a thoughtful, well-reasoned person came to a different conclusion. Rand's code hero's are like Klingons, its about the honor. I can respect that, even if I completely disagree with the person. That's the root of my grudging "respect" for Dik Chainy; he does not back down. Bless his pointed little head.


"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
objectivism is nonsense on its face (0.00 / 0)
im a subjectivist and so are we all.

[ Parent ]
I'm looking for new place to live (0.00 / 0)
let me know which planet has outlawed Republicans, which by the way, burn rather nicely.

"It sounds wrong...
     ...but its right."


[ Parent ]
i support decriminalization of Republicanism (4.00 / 3)
we need to move away from punishment and towards harm reduction, trying to help these people change their self-destructive behaviors

not everything worth doing is profitable. not everything profitable is worth doing.

[ Parent ]
Show this to friends and family. (0.00 / 0)
Chris, Can I copy this post and email it to my friends and family?  I will give the original post credit and a link back.

Thanks

Our Dime Understanding the U.S. Budget


send as email link (0.00 / 0)
Is in the footer of the post, or here.

[ Parent ]
Wonderful use of statistics! (4.00 / 1)
Your chart really puts things in perspective. Its amazing just to see that list of issues and realize that even after two big elections wins for the left in 2006 and 2008, the overall tone of our government is still astonishingly out of step with the increasing liberal mood of the country.

I'm starting to think that 2006 and 2008 may just be examples of "normal" elections from here on out, and we will look back at 2002 and 2004 as the real flukes.

It surprises me the the GOP has apparently been completely incapable of moving even a little to the left. Except for maybe the new "hip hop" GOP strategy...  

ec=-8.50 soc=-8.41   (3,967 Watts)


and.... (4.00 / 1)
now that social change has been reduced to a popularity contest....i guess I can get a lot of rest knowing that freedom has arrived for the 91 percent of black male high school dropouts who are unemployed.....at least they're not republicans.

i'm not sure the polls are a big surprise. (4.00 / 1)
Granted, I haven't kept up, but normal people--those who oppose the 'war on drugs' are in favor of legalization.  Legal pot means tax revenues, a regulated product, and a reduction in crime.

I am the mother of a teenager.  Her friend's parents pretend they never toked up.  Or, if they did, it was okay because pot was different--mild as opposed to today's which causes your brain to ooze out of your ear.  Perhaps the last time they got high was 1969.  Pot was strong 20 years ago.  If parents think it is too potent then it should be legalized.

Oh, by the way--anyone notice the increase in college date rape?  It seemed to spurt when pot became criminalized (after the decriminalization movement of the 70's) and not available. So, drinking to excess was the only way to alter your reality.  Drinking makes for aggressive behavior.  Pot doesn't. Coincidence?  I don't think so.

LEGALIZE IT!


I live in a true blue state--I will have a choice in November


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